Richmond COVID-19 vaccination programme

Last updated: 18 June 2021


Over 18? Book your COVID-19 vaccination online now

If you’re aged over 18, a carer or have an underlying health condition, call 119 or visit nhs.uk/covid-vaccination to book your COVID-19 vaccination appointment.

Your local NHS is delivering the biggest vaccination programme in its history. Everyone has an important part to play to help us with this programme of work

  • The COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective. They will give you the best protection against coronavirus.
  • It’s never too late to get the Covid vaccine. It’s safe and effective, but speak to your GP if you have any concerns.

Who’s being prioritised for vaccination?

Our priority remains vaccinating the most vulnerable people in south west London. The NHS will offer you a vaccination when it’s your turn – this will be when you’re in a priority group.

What do you need to know about appointments?

When it’s your turn, you’ll be invited by the NHS to book an appointment.

Where can you get vaccinated?

The vaccination is being offered in a variety of places across south west London, including GP and pharmacy-led services, hospitals and community vaccination centres.

You may also be able to have your first vaccination at one of the following walk-in clinics in south west London – but not everyone is eligible, so please check the clinic details before deciding to go.


Weekly update

Appointments for a second dose of a vaccine will be brought forward from 12 to eight weeks for those over 50 or those who are more clinically vulnerable to coronavirus. This is relevant to people in the top nine priority groups. The NHS will contact those who should bring their appointment forward. There is no requirement to contact the NHS for this.

To make it easier for local people to take up their COVID-19 vaccination we are opening up a number of our centres as a walk in service for those who are eligible. Find your nearest walk-in session.

Read more in our weekly borough update

Highlight of the week

GP Dr Pambos talks about how side effects from the COVID vaccine are common and usually nothing to worry about.

Explore more local content about COVID-19 vaccination


Top questions

People at greater risk of getting seriously ill due to COVID-19 are being offered their second vaccine earlier as part of plans to tackle the spread of the variant first identified in India.  The NHS will contact those who should bring their appointment forward when they are able to do so – nobody needs to contact the NHS, wait for us to contact you.

Scientists continue to look carefully at the characteristics of the virus in relation to the vaccines.  There is no evidence currently that the new strains will be resistant to the vaccines we have, and vaccination remains the best protection we have against COVID-19. Viruses, such as the winter flu virus, often branch into different strains but these small variations rarely render vaccines ineffective. 

The tests our local lab offers for COVID antibodies only show if a patient has had a previous infection. They do not confirm if a patient has developed antibodies following a vaccination.

Any vaccines that the NHS provides has passed strict tests on their safety and effectiveness. However, the JCVI has advised that for adults under age 40 without underlying health conditions should receive an alternative to the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine – where available and only if this does not cause substantial delays in being vaccinated. 

If you’re planning to travel abroad, you can get proof that you’ve been fully vaccinated against Covid-19 via the NHS app, NHS website, or by calling 119.  Please do not contact your GP about your vaccination status as GPs cannot provide letters showing your vaccine record.  Some countries may also require a negative Covid-19 test result.  Always check the entry requirements for the country you are visiting before you book your travel.  Step-by-step travel advice can be found on the Government website.

Currently no vaccine has been approved for use in the UK for people under 16 years of age.  In rare circumstances, GPs may offer a vaccine to children who are at high risk from COVID-19, following a discussion of the benefits and risks with the patient and their parents or guardians.


Information in different formats and languages

You can translate all the written content on this website by using the language menu in the top right hand corner of this page.

Useful resources are available in many languages and formats, including British Sign Language, which will help you to learn more about the vaccine and how it’s being offered. The handy resources have been produced by the NHS, Public Health England and partners.


Engagement with local communities

We know that in Richmond some communities are less likely to take up the offer of the vaccine than other groups.  

We’re engaging with local communities to give people the chance to ask local experts about the vaccine so that they can make informed decisions and we can understand any concerns they may have. 

We’re working with our local vaccination team, the Council, Healthwatch and community groups to understand where take up is low in our borough so we can target engagement where it is needed. Recently, working with Refugee Action Kingston, we’ve arranged a meeting for Korean people across south west London to talk about the vaccine. 

To find out more about local engagement, you can read the Richmond Communications and Engagement Plan.

If you would like to attend a local COVID-19 vaccination event or find out more, email getinvolved@swlondon.nhs.uk      



COVID-19 news


Borough updates


For the latest coronavirus updates, and information from your area, please visit Richmond Council.